Calendar


Murnaghan Public Lecture

05/19/2010

Flyer for Murnaghan lecture featuring Andre Davis (PDF)

The Francis D. Murnaghan, Jr. Appelate Advocacy Fellowship Presents:

Lecture on Law, Civil Liberties, and Public Policy

Featuring Andre M. Davis

Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

Moderated by
Congressman John Sarbanes
 

Discussing "Invisible Influences: Judges, Jurors & Justice"

Courts and commentators have long talked about the role of unconscious biases and how they influence decision-making that bears on legally relevant subject matter. And for more than a decade, psychologists have employed empirical methods to ferret out unconscious biases and to aid in discerning what they are and how they operate. As such, it is no surprise that legal scholars have drawn from this research on "implicit" bias to highlight unconscious biases among legal decision-makers (i.e., juries, lawyers, and judges) and within substantive areas of the law. In fact, several law reviews have dedicated entire symposia to the topic. Judge Davis will discuss how this body of social scientific research should enhance our understanding about the "invisible influences" within the law.
 
Wednesday, May 19, 2010
6:00 P.M.
 
The Walters Art Museum,
Graham Auditorium
600 North Charles Street
Baltimore, Maryland
Centre Street Entrance
 
Free and Open to the Public
For more information email murnaghan@aspecialgathering.com or call (410) 685-7664.
 
Co-sponsored by the Public Justice Center and the Walters Art Museum
 

The Francis D. Murnaghan, Jr. Appellate Advocacy Fellowship

Judge Francis D. Murnaghan, Jr. was renowned as a champion of civil rights and civil liberties. After Judge Murnaghan's death in 2000, his colleagues, friends, family and former clerks established a fellowship to carry on the legacy of this remarkable lawyer and judge. The Francis D. Murnaghan, Jr. Appellate Advocacy Fellowship is a one-year fellowship awarded annually and open to former judicial law clerks. The Fellow works with the Appellate Advocacy Project at the Public Justice Center in Baltimore on appeals involving civil rights and social justice impact litigation in Maryland and federal appellate courts.
 
c/o Public Justice Center, Inc. | One North Charles Street, Suite 200 | Baltimore, MD 21201-3710 |
(410) 625-9409 | www.murnaghanfellowship.org
 
 

The Honorable Andre M. Davis

United States Circuit Judge
United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
 
Judge Davis received his B.A. in American History from the University of Pennsylvania and his J.D., with honors, from the University of Maryland School of Law, where he won Best Advocate in the Myerowitz Moot Court Competition, and chaired the Honor Board. The faculty awarded him the prestigious Roger Howell Award at graduation.
 
Upon graduation from law school, he completed one-year clerkships with Judge Frank A. Kaufman on the U.S. District Court in Baltimore and Judge Francis D. Murnaghan, Jr., on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. Thereafter, Judge Davis served as an appellate attorney for the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington and as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Maryland, where he handled both civil and criminal cases. He later was in private practice and, from 1984 until 1987, he was an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Maryland School of Law. He continues to teach as an adjunct faculty member of the law school and he also serves as a member of the law school's Board of Visitors.
 
Judge Davis served on the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City from 1987 through 1990 and on the Circuit Court for Baltimore City from 1990 until his appointment in August 1995 to the U.S. District Court by President Bill Clinton. Since 1994, he has been a member of the faculty of the National Judicial College. He is a frequent lecturer on aspects of civil and criminal practice for legal and judicial education and training entities.
 
Judge Davis served on the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City from 1987 through 1990 and on the Circuit Court for Baltimore City from 1990 until his appointment in August 1995 to the U.S. District Court by President Bill Clinton. Since 1994, he has been a member of the faculty of the National Judicial College. He is a frequent lecturer on aspects of civil and criminal practice for legal and judicial education and training entities.
 
Judge Davis is a past president of the Executive Committee of the Maryland Judicial Conference and a former member of the board of directors of the Judicial Institute of Maryland. He was, for many years, a member of the Section Council on Correctional Reform of the Maryland State Bar Association. He served a one year term as the Chair of the Conference of Federal Trial Judges, one of the constituent entities within the Judicial Division of the ABA. He has served in numerous civic and professional leadership roles, including a two-year term as President of Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Central Maryland and a two-year term as President of the Legal Aid Bureau, Inc. He is a member of the board and Vice Chair of the Open Society Institute-Baltimore. He has served for ten years as chair and member of the board of Community Law in Action, Inc., a law-related high school leadership development program; and Chair of the board of the Baltimore Urban Debate League.
 
Judge Davis has been active in numerous national and international judicial education and Rule of Law training programs through his membership on the Judicial Conference of the United States/Committee on International Judicial Relations, the Einstein Institute for Science, Health and the Courts, and the Federal Judicial Center. He has participated in many programs, including, among others, workshops and seminars in Russia, Armenia, Poland, Ukraine, Kosovo, Swaziland, Nigeria, Uganda, South Africa, Tanzania, Mali, and Egypt.
 
Judge Davis was nominated by President Obama to a vacancy on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit created by the death of Judge Murnaghan. The Senate confirmed him on November 10, 2009, and he entered on duty on November 12, 2009.